Why did the editor miss errors in your book?

What is the price of perfection? When you pay for professional editing, shouldn’t you be assured that your book will be error-free? Accuracy rates for professional editors today are quite high. Yet language and the art of writing don’t lend themselves to a strictly formulaic approach. Reader-reported errors and fumbles that creep in during revisions don’t necessarily point to poor editing.

Here’s how to strike a balance between unreasonable expectations and professional standards.

Is demanding perfection realistic?

Editing is as much an art as it is a science. Even so, most professions work within accepted accuracy rates, and editing is no different. A 95 percent accuracy rate makes a respectable benchmark for editing, according to several experts cited in a well-documented discussion of editorial error rates. That sounds like a reasonable benchmark to me—and for many books, it might be.

error rateBut what about your book? Should you expect to find 5 percent of the errors left in? To gain some perspective, consider the heavy line edit I did last year for a first-time author on a book that started out at well over 150,000 words. The edit generated 33,310 revisions.

That’s not a mistake. I made more than 33,000 edits to the document. And that doesn’t include the changes made silently so the author wouldn’t have to accept or reject each one.

15,300 insertions
17,088 deletions
112 moves
11 formatting changes
799 comments

A 95 percent accuracy rate on that number of revisions would mean I made 1,650 errors, a result I can assure you didn’t happen—but it might give you a better idea of the scope of a professional edit. And of course those revision totals don’t account for issues I might have missed completely.

Does a handful of errors in a book mean you received poor editing? Consider those 33,000 things that did get fixed; your conclusion might shift.

Errors in the wild

Let’s look at the errors being found in books in the wild. A blog post about Amazon’s quality assurance system includes this quote direct from a Kindle Direct Publishing representative: “While we are not able to disclose this specific formula, please be informed that an average sized novel with around 3000 locations will trigger the quality warning with 10-15 typos.” To understand what Amazon considers a typo or an error, I encourage you to read that post. It explains quite clearly the type of issues that Amazon does and does not look for.

When it comes to reader-reported errors and critical reviews, it may be time to drag out the fifty-pound bag of rock salt. There’s a good chance that many reader-reported errors aren’t actually errors at all; they’re choices, and they’re choices that a professional author (that’s you) made in conjunction with an informed professional (that’s me). Amazon reviewers are notorious for such foolishness as screeching about grammar and usage that have evolved since they took English twenty-five years ago (from a teacher whose own knowledge was in turn twenty-five years old) or for flaming books containing “typos” that turn out to be British English spellings from a British author. Right.

What you can do to reduce error rates

As an editor, I rely on more than my education and professional training, years of experience, vigilance, and skill to find mistakes in your manuscript. For every edit, I run redundant checks using tools as basic as MS Word’s native spellcheck feature and as specialized as professional software designed to check for accuracy, consistency, and style guidelines specific to fiction in general and to your book in particular. And that’s just to get the manuscript warmed up.

One of the best ways to reduce errors in your book is to prevent them from happening in the first place.

Know what you’re paying for. If you use a professional editor, know what specific services your editor is providing. For example, if you are paying for a content edit (also known as a developmental edit), your editor won’t be looking for language errors. A content edit covers big-picture issues like plot, setting, and dialogue. When I do a content edit, I “switch hats” from copyediting concerns. I may still mark some mechanical issues along the way, but that’s not my focus—and in fact, I’ll be actively steering my attention away from those matters so I can concentrate on the big picture.

Or maybe your book needs content editing but you’re trying to save money, so you go for a line edit in hopes of dipping far enough into the big-picture issues to satisfy reader sensibilities. Budgets are a thing—I get that, and sometimes I’ll work with an author who needs this sort of hybrid line/content help. But if that’s you, keep your feet on the ground and be aware of what’s sacrificed in such a scenario. Your editor’s attention will be divided between substantive and mechanical issues.

Start with a cleaner manuscript. Common sense dictates that a cleaner product at the start means an even cleaner product at the end. Study your craft. Not only will you produce tighter, more effective writing, but you’ll build the foundation you need to shade your work with more subtle, advanced techniques. Use spellcheck, and try a program like Grammarly; you’ll have to wade through a lot of false positives, but I guarantee you’ll catch a few issues, too.

Slow the heck down. Especially if you’ve chosen an editor who keeps error rates low by letting you accept and reject your own edits (hi there, me again!), slow the heck down. When you whiz through your revisions, the likelihood of introducing new errors soars. Any time you touch the document after your editor does, assume the worst and cover your tracks. Run spellcheck when you’re done. Get someone with a fresh eye to read the final edit before you upload. I know it’s exciting to have your edited book finally in hand, but don’t be in such a rush that you skip rechecking fresh revisions.

Work with, not against, your editor. Your editor is on your side. While you don’t need to tattle about every post-edit issue you discover, do let your editor know what’s made it through into the error bucket. I’m always adjusting my processes and tuning my ear for issues. Help me help your book.

Ask for help if you need it. If you’re having trouble making sense of the tracked changes on your edit, ask your editor for help. I’ve written an article to make your revision process much more efficient and effective than wearing out your mouse finger by clicking Accept and Reject over and over. On the other hand, if you blindly Accept All edits, you risk bricking over examples, queries, and comments from your editor. Your editor may be able to review revised sections at no charge or for a greatly reduced fee. Please ask.

Finish with proofreading. Once you’ve incorporated all your editor’s edits and recommendations, made your revisions, and finished your last-minute tweaks, check the whole thing again. A fresh set of eyes at this stage of the game is essential, so if you’re going to hire someone to proofread your final manuscript or layout, ask your editor for a recommendation. This could be a good time to pull in all those buddies who’ve promised to help; just be sure to verify that their recommendations are in fact accurate. Ask your editor if you’re unsure.


Nib_100The best way to reduce errors in your book is to choose a good editor. Ready to hire a pro? That editor could be me